EIC Connect 2017 – Power, Nuclear & Renewables

28–29 November, Liverpool.

The Energy Industries Council (EIC) presents its flagship event to bring together operators, developers and OEMs from across the world to support UK enterprise and expertise in the global power, nuclear and renewables sectors.

EIC Connect 2017

The first day focuses on the nuclear sector, with speakers from industry, research and government. Nuclear AMRC chief executive Andrew Storer will appear as part of the opening plenary session alongside Tom Greatrex, chief executive of the Nuclear Industry Association, and Richard McLaren, new build director at Wood.

The event also includes opportunities for one-to-one discussions with buyers and decision-makers from the speaker companies, plus a networking dinner.

The second day then focuses on the broader power and renewables sectors.

The EIC expects at least 500 UK-based businesses to attend, all with the capacity, technology and innovation to build and maintain large scale energy projects.

For more information and to register, go to the EIC Connect event website.

Nuclear Security Leadership and Professionalism

14 December 2017, London.

The Nuclear Institute’s second annual Nuclear Security event will build on the highly successful first conference in 2016, which clearly acknowledged the importance of nuclear security organisation integration.

This full day conference will explore the latest security threats to businesses operating in the nuclear sector, and provide delegates with the latest understanding of what tomorrow’s challenges are and how to maintain resilience against ever-changing threat and risk profiles.

For more information and to register, visit the NI event page.

NI security Dec17

Supercritical benefits for deep hole drilling

Nuclear AMRC machining engineers have completed their first cutting trials using a new supercritical carbon dioxide coolant system.

The innovative system has been fitted on the large Starrag HEC1800 horizontal boring machine, and delivers supercritical CO2 at pressures of over 100 bar.

A supercritical fluid combines the physical properties of both a liquid and a gas. Many substances can become supercritical at a sufficiently high temperature and pressure – for CO2, supercritical conditions are above 74 bar and 31°C.

“A supercritical fluid doesn’t have distinct gas and liquid phases,” says Dr Krystian Wika, Nuclear AMRC technology lead for advanced coolants. “The advantage for machining is that the coolant has the density of a liquid, so it can carry out the swarf from really deep holes, but it also behaves like a gas.”

scCO2 breakthrough

The supercritical CO2 technology was developed at the University of Michigan and is exclusively licenced to Fusion Coolant Systems, which is supplying the Nuclear AMRC’s new equipment. The technology has been shown to increase cutting speeds and reduce tool wear, compared to traditional oil-based coolants and minimum quantity lubricant (MQL) techniques.

For the nuclear sector, supercritical CO2 can potentially be used for deep-hole drilling operations which are essential for components such as heat exchanger tube plates.

Wika’s team will initially focus on small diameter drilling, where the wear mechanism of the tool edge and effects on the workpiece’s material properties are not well understood for supercritical CO2. During initial trials, the coolant will be delivered through the spindle at a pressure of around 120 bar and temperature of 34°C. Further research will then optimise the parameters for specific applications.

scCO2 monitor

Deploying the Fusion system on the large Starrag platform will also let the team develop CO2 cooling techniques for large component turning. This can avoid problems which occur when liquid coolants collect within a large part and affect its centre of mass.

The HEC 1800 is now equipped with a choice of coolant options including high pressure fluid and supercritical CO2 with or without MQL. Supercritical CO2 is an excellent solvent, Wika notes, which allows a perfect mix of MQL and CO2 for the most demanding applications.

Supercritical CO2 coolant is different to the near-cryogenic coolants which Wika’s team have previously investigated. Cryogenic research at the centre has focused on the ChilAire technology, which delivers a controlled stream of carbon dioxide gas and CO2 ice particles at temperatures as low as –78°C. The team are now investigating how that technology can be made more flexible so that it can be easily deployed on any machining platform.

CNSIG wins NDA award

Civil Nuclear Sharing in Growth, the high-intensity supplier development programme led by the Nuclear AMRC and Rolls-Royce, has won the Capability and Capacity Award at the NDA supply chain awards 2017.

The annual awards recognise the vital contribution of suppliers to the UK’s nuclear clean-up mission. Winners were announced at the NDA Estate Supply Chain Event, held in Manchester on 2 November.

The Civil Nuclear Sharing in Growth programme (CNSIG) is developing the UK manufacturing supply chain for civil nuclear – in new build, operations and decommissioning – to help UK companies win work in the nuclear industry at home and overseas. CNSIG is part-funded by government through the Regional Growth Fund and by Rolls-Royce.

NDA awards 2017

The participating companies are receiving a four-year programme of business development and training, tailored to the specific needs of their business, supported by £1 million match-funding for each company. This includes shopfloor manufacturing improvement, process improvement, leadership development and specific nuclear sector knowledge.

To date (end of September 2017), the participating companies have reported that CNSIG has helped them secure around £507 million of orders, creating or safeguarding 6,040 jobs, and have committed an additional £51.6 million private investment. The current programme runs until December 2017.

One of the CNSIG participants, James Fisher Nuclear, was highly commended for the NDA Collaboration Award for its innovative use of UAVs to assess the structural integrity of buildings at Sellafield.

Other winners included Nuvia, a tier two member of the Nuclear AMRC, which won the Technology Innovation Implementation Award for dismantling a 61 metre  separation area head end stack at Sellafield.

NIA Nuclear 2017

Thursday 7 December, London.

The Nuclear Industry Association’s annual conference Nuclear 2017 will bring together speakers from across all parts of the nuclear industry to discuss key developments in 2017 and look ahead to 2018.

NIA Nuclear 2017

Nuclear 2017 will look at all the issues across new build, operations and decommissioning, and opportunities for next year and beyond.

The sector’s senior leaders will discuss Brexit, geological disposal, new nuclear and more, with Nuclear AMRC chief executive Andrew Storer presenting a new model to understand supply chain opportunities.

For more information and to register, go to: nuclear2017.co.uk

NDA Estate Supply Chain Event

Thursday 2 November, Manchester.

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority presents its seventh annual supply chain event, Europe’s largest networking event for the nuclear decommissioning sector.

Last year’s showcase event attracted around 1,600 delegates, providing opportunities to network with more than 280 exhibiting companies. With a particular focus on SMEs, the event also aims to attract new businesses to the nuclear decommissioning sector.

The event is free to attend, and offers free exhibition space for qualifying companies. For more information, go to decommsupplyevent.co.uk

The Nuclear AMRC will be exhibiting on stand M12, with Fit For Nuclear industrial advisors available for one-to-one discussions.

The Department of International Trade is offering one-to-one meetings and networking to manufacturers interested in export opportunities in China, Japan, France and other countries. For more information, email ndasuppliersday2017@diteventspecialist.co.uk

NDA supply chain 17

Game Changers challenge: analytical services

14 November 2017, NPL Teddington.

The Game Changers programmes presents its latest one-day challenge event to find innovative solutions to the decommissioning challenges at Sellafield.

In collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory and GAU Radioanalytical, Game Changers invites companies and organisations to bring their innovative techniques, technologies and solutions to the challenges faced by Sellafield’s Analytical Services teams.

gamechangers analytical

At present, Sellafield analytical operations take place in a facility that is over 50 years old using decades-old processes. The current laboratory is being phased out, with the majority of the future work to be performed in the re-fitted National Nuclear Laboratory Central Lab. This presents a great opportunity for new and innovative technologies and techniques to be introduced in support of the Analytical Services teams.

The challenge event will introduce personnel from Sellafield’s Integrated Research Teams and present specific challenges at interactive presentations and workshops. It will be of particular interest to businesses and academia in the laboratory technology sector including instrumentation, control and automation – Sellafield will particularly welcome interest from organisations operating in other sectors such as oil and gas, biosciences or aerospace which can bring their innovations and technologies into nuclear decommissioning.

For more information and to register, go to the Game Changers website.

Previous challenge events have focused on waste containers (hosted by the Nuclear AMRC in November 2016) and digital and smart technologies. Other challenges include plant dismantling, post-operational clean out, and decommissioning infrastructure.

 

 

Professor Steve Jones appointed CTO

Renowned welding expert Professor Steve Jones has joined the Nuclear AMRC as its new chief technology officer (CTO).

Professor Jones joins from Coventry University, where he held the post of professor in manufacturing systems and processes at the Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering Institute. He previously worked at Rolls-Royce as global engineering specialist for joining sciences, where he worked closely with the company’s civil nuclear division to secure the ASME N-stamp qualification, and worked with the Nuclear AMRC as visiting professor of welding engineering.

As CTO, Professor Jones is responsible for ensuring that the Nuclear AMRC is focused on providing innovative technical solutions that will give the UK supply chain a competitive advantage in the global nuclear market.

“The CTO is a fundamental position in the organisation, and Steve will be a great addition to the centre and the team,” says Nuclear AMRC chief executive officer Andrew Storer. “I am really pleased to welcome Steve, who will be responsible for ensuring our technical strategy is directly linked to the market, to make sure we are delivering the right applied research for UK industry.

Steve Jones ebw

Professor Jones will lead the development of the technology strategy at the Nuclear AMRC, ensuring that the centre is delivering truly advanced manufacturing methods to the nuclear industry. A fundamental part of this is to make sure that the centre is meeting the current needs of the supply chain to improve productivity and reduce manufacturing risk in machining and fabrication.

“Our sector is understandably very conservative, so introducing new technologies that challenge existing codes and practices requires extremely strong de-risking procedures reinforced by substantial data to justify their inception,” Professor Jones says.

“I believe there are still significant benefits to be realised through optimising current practices and competences. This will accelerate performance and improve capability, without the need for a step change in skills and unnecessary costs.”

Jones started his manufacturing career in 1980 as an apprentice welder with Rolls-Royce Motors in Shrewsbury. He studied for 17 years with the Open University while working in industry, achieving his doctorate in materials and welding engineering in 2003.

“Combining engineering practicality with long-term academic training allows me to describe myself as a ‘pracademic’ – a word I am cautious about using in potentially tongue-tied situations, but a credential that I hope will add to the already highly proficient skills set at the Nuclear AMRC,” he says.

Professor Jones is a Chartered Engineer and Fellow of The Welding Institute. He succeeds Stuart Dawson as CTO, who has moved to the same position at the Nuclear AMRC’s sister centre, the AMRC with Boeing.

Export opportunities with Bechtel

28 September 2017, Birmingham.

Bechtel, UK Export Finance (UKEF) and the Energy Industries Council (EIC) invite companies to register their interest in supplying high-value opportunities in the nuclear, oil & gas, and civil infrastructure sectors.

Bechtel is building on its track record of supporting UK exports through UKEF financing and collaboration on future projects. With the support of the EIC, UKEF is looking for UK companies in the energy and infrastructure sectors which can deliver the projects.

All registrations will be shared with Bechtel’s procurement team, who are actively seeking UK suppliers. Selected companies will be invited to attend a Bechtel supplier event in Birmingham on 28 September where they can meet with the procurement teams, explore future contracts and present their capabilities to Bechtel.

For more information and to register your interest, go to the EIC event page.

Bechtel EIC UKEF

£20 million Magnox work for DavyMarkham

The Nuclear AMRC’s newest member company has secured a £20 million contract to produce waste containers for Magnox.

Sheffield-based heavy engineering specialist DavyMarkham will work with its sister company, Amber Precast, to design, test and construct transportable 6m3 concrete containers for intermediate-level waste (ILW) from the Magnox reactors. DavyMarkham is creating a new dedicated plant and up to 50 jobs at its site in Darnall to carry out the work.

“Being awarded this supply contract for concrete ILW containers is a step forward for DavyMarkham in its drive to become the UK leader in providing high integrity containers to the nuclear industry,” says Bill Clark, DavyMarkham managing director.

“It’s good to see the government and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority supporting strategic UK manufacturing companies which benefit the UK’s nuclear decommissioning industry as well as securing UK jobs. Importantly, it also provides UK manufacturers export opportunities with overseas buyers who are looking for innovative high-integrity products in support of safe decommissioning.”

The four-year contract will draw on DavyMarkham’s expertise in high quality steel fabrications for container casings and handling features, and the precast concrete capabilities of Derbyshire-based Amber Precast. Both firms are part of the Hughes-Armstrong Industries group.

Once the final design and manufacturing methodology have been approved, Magnox will require more than 1,000 of these 6m3 boxes to store various types of intermediate-level waste from the operational and early decommissioning phases of its UK power stations.

DavyMarkham Magnox

With a history going back to 1830, DavyMarkham is a leader in the design, manufacture and assembly of large equipment for mining, power generation, oil, gas and nuclear sectors. Since Clark led a buyout of the company in 2014 alongside Hughes-Armstrong, DavyMarkham has increasingly positioned itself at the top end of the manufacturing technology spectrum.

The contract was announced as DavyMarkham joined the Nuclear AMRC as a tier two member

“Membership of the Nuclear AMRC demonstrates DavyMarkham’s commitment to participating in the nuclear supply chain through collaboration and innovation with key strategic partners,” says Dr Alan Thompson, director of quality at DavyMarkham.

“We will work with the centre’s engineers and partners to create production routes where technological developments and manufacturing excellence will deliver the required quality at an acceptable cost, and extend our research programme to reduce costs and manufacturing lead times.”

DavyMarkham works with nuclear customers including Sellafield Ltd, AWE and Rolls-Royce. The firm completed the Fit For Nuclear programme in March 2016, and appointed industry veteran John Cheek as nuclear and defence director in October.